Playing Barefoot and in Traditional Mestizo Huipiles, the Amazonas of Yaxunah Softball Team Win Big in First International Game

the Amazonas of Yaxunah Softball Team

The Amazonas of Yaxunah are no ordinary softball team. They proudly begin every game with a heart-stopping Maya battle cry, concluding with the potent roar of “¡mujeres fuertes!” - a proclamation of strong women. And indeed, strong they are.


In 2018, the Amazonas came together, a joyful gathering of women from Yucatán seeking nothing more than a playful outlet. Yet, their distinctive barefoot playing style and traditional Mestizo huipil attire soon elevated them from a mere community pastime to the center of public fascination.

the Amazonas of Yaxunah Softball TeamFacebook of Calin Saenz, Director General at Instituto del Deporte del Estado de YucatánFacebook of Calin Saenz, Director General at Instituto del Deporte del Estado de Yucatán

Their talent, passion, and vibrant culture opened doors to play exhibition games in packed Mexican stadiums. Yet, the crowning achievement, a dream many of them might not have even dared to dream, materialized recently: playing in an MLB stadium.

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S., the Amazonas took to the diamond at Chase Field, home to the Arizona Diamondbacks. Facing off against the Falcons of the University of Phoenix Valley, they delivered a stunning victory, defeating their opponents 22-3. And to top off their historic visit to the U.S., they were also honored with the opportunity to pitch the inaugural throw in the subsequent MLB game.

the Amazonas of Yaxunah Softball TeamFacebook of Calin Saenz, Director General at Instituto del Deporte del Estado de YucatánFacebook of Calin Saenz, Director General at Instituto del Deporte del Estado de Yucatán

Such an incredible feat can't be attributed to luck. It was the stellar pitching of Patricia Tec and Juanita Moo that kept Arizona's offense in check. Meanwhile, the superb batting skills of Lili Chan, Citlali Dzib, and Berenice Ay cemented the team's dominant position.

The Amazonas, despite their newfound fame, remain rooted in their traditions.

Playing barefoot and donning the Mestizo huipil, they've demonstrated that while they play primarily for enjoyment, their athletic prowess is undeniable. Many of these women hail from different rural communities across the Yucatán, spanning ages from teenagers to late 50s, and many balancing household responsibilities or crafting as their primary vocations.

With this victory, the Amazonas have not only made Yaxunah proud but have also planted a flag for women everywhere, proving that with passion, commitment, and a dash of tradition, anything is possible.


***CORRECTION: The exhibition game was reported by "The Yucatan Times" as being with the "Falcons of the University of Phoenix Valley." Luz previously incorrectly reported "Arizona State University."
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