Latina Trap Queens You Can't Ignore: Vol. 2

From left to right: Young Miko, Yendry, Cazzu, Princess Nokia
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The world of music is constantly evolving, and nothing embodies this more than the rising popularity of Trap Latino. This genre has become a powerful force, gradually climbing the charts, and many talented Latina singer-songwriters are at the forefront of this movement.


These women are not only making waves in the music industry, but they understand the importance of using their platforms to lift each other up, creating new feminist anthems, and advocating for more women in the urban scene. Their music offers a fresh perspective, one that is sorely needed in a genre that has often been dominated by male voices.

Take a look at the second part of our two-part series featuring Latina trap queens who are a must-have addition to your chingona playlist.


Yendry

Yendry

Source: Instagram

Source: Instagram

Born in Rome to Dominican and Haitian parents, Yendry was singing and dancing from the moment she could walk. At 17, she packed her bags and headed to New York to chase her dreams, where she worked as a model and started making connections in the music scene.

She began writing and recording her own music, blending R&B, trap, and reggaeton with lyrics that reflect her multicultural background and experiences. She has spoken about seeing Karol G as a role model, noting that she was the first prominent artist to share her songs on social media. From there, she had an avalanche of followers.

Her lyrics speak to themes of love, identity, and self-discovery, and her ethereal vocals give her songs an otherworldly feel. Her music is authentic, blending her Caribbean roots with her experiences growing up in Italy and the United States to create a unique sound that is pure energy and soul.

As an Afro-Latina, Yendry takes pride in her cultural identity and infuses her music and personal style with her heritage. She is an activist for social justice, using her influence to raise awareness about women’s rights and racism. Yendry is a rising artist with a distinct blend of musical talent, personal style, and dedication to making a difference.

For Your Playlist:

Young Miko

Young Miko

Source: Instagram

Source: Instagram

A Puerto Rican star on the rise, María Ramírez, known by her stage name Young Miko, strives to give voice to feminism and the LGBTQIA+ community through her music, as she is one of the few openly lesbian artists in the Latin trap scene, with her lyrics often showcasing her love for women unapologetically. Her music videos are filled with women and queer people having fun, owning their sexuality, and enjoying each other’s presence.

A successful rapper, singer, songwriter, and talented tattoo artist on top of that, Young Miko points to Ivy Queen as being one of her biggest influences. She is good friends with Cazzu and Villano Antillano, having stated that women in the trap scene don’t compete; they support each other. “I’m proud to be part of the growth that we are witnessing right now. Thank God there are many more girls in the spotlight now, although there were always women making a difference,” Miko commented.

At just 25 years old and with only a couple of singles out, Miko has taken the world by storm with her low, breathy voice and moody trap beats, recently appearing alongside Bad Bunny on stage at his latest tour, joining Karol G onstage, going viral on TikTok, and launching her very first EP, “Trap Kitty.”

For Your Playlist:

Cazzu

Cazzu

Source: Instagram

Source: Instagram

After finishing middle school, Argentine rapper, singer, and songwriter Julieta Cazzuchelli started working and saving up to pay for her first recordings and video clips. “I was my first investor. Every penny I made, I invested it in making videos and songs,” she states. Starting off as a cumbia artist under the artistic name “Juli-K” and then venturing into the rock genre without much success. She eventually began making trap music in 2017, which at the time wasn’t nearly as popular as it is today, and adopted the stage name “Cazzu.”

After hitting the charts for the first time with her song collab “Loca” along with Khea, Duki, and Bad Bunny in 2018, Cazzu has steadily risen to the top. With her distinctive goth e-girl aesthetic and sweet, unique voice, she has established herself as one of Argentina’s most prominent urban artists.

She has spoken out about women being more harshly criticized as urban artists, despite the majority of them being badass rappers, amazing singers, and also writing their own songs, something that many male urban artists don’t necessarily do. “The spaces for women in trap music continue to be criticized from a more hostile point of view,” she said in an interview for Los 40, “criticism will always be more meticulous when it comes to women, even if they are breaking barriers and making great trap music."

For Your Playlist:

Princess Nokia

Princess Nokia

Source: Instagram

Source: Instagram

Through her creative work and activism, Princess Nokia has gained significant cultural influence. Destiny Nicole Frasqueri, who was born and raised in Manhattan and the Bronx, draws inspiration from these boroughs that have greatly influenced her artistic expression and worldview.

As a child, Frasqueri, who identifies as Afro-Indigenous and has Puerto Rican heritage, faced many challenges. She lost her mother to AIDS at a young age and spent most of her childhood in foster care until she reached the age of sixteen. Fortunately, her grandmother became her caregiver and supported her in discovering her talent and passion for writing and performing.

Together with Milah Libin, Frasqueri co-founded the Smart Girl Club podcast, which focuses on intersectional feminism, healthy living, and urban feminism. In her music, Frasqueri incorporates her spiritual and clairvoyant experiences as a practitioner of Santería, resulting in a truly unique sound. Her lyrics explore intricate themes of feminism, race, and identity.

In addition to her music, Princess Nokia is a vocal activist, particularly for women's rights and the Afro-Latine community.

For Your Playlist:

The music industry has been dominated by men for far too long, with Trap and Reggaeton often featuring misogynistic lyrics and male voices. Now, a revolutionary wave of Latinas is emerging, creating a vibrant community that empowers and inspires women to achieve greater heights. It's a long-awaited shift, and it's finally happening.

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