You Know You’re Latinx if You Grew Up with These Items in Your Home

Household items.

There are so many things that bring nostalgia to us from our childhood and other things that just make you cringe at the memory of them. As Team Luz got together to discuss the different items that we all had in our upbringings, we questioned if we had the same childhood after discovering all the similarities in our Latinx homes. Take a walk down memory lane with us as we remember all the things you probably had in your home as well!


Home Interior Decor

Does anyone else wonder why none of these decorations had people of color in their frames but yet our moms loved to decorate the home with them? Totally canceled in our books but still a memory worth sharing.

Framed painting.

Source: Gigi Wagner Pinterest

So many religious symbols

Whether it was la Virgen de Guadalupe, a cross, or a print of the Last Supper hanging in your dining room, you knew walking into a Latinx home that you were protected and maybe even closer to heaven. Between the free calendar of the virgencita obtained at the local mercado and your abuelas constant praying, it felt like church was always at home.

Virgen de Guadalupe

Source: MexGrocer

Plastic bags under the sink

Reuse, reduce, recycle – it’s always been a lifestyle for Latinos and this one we’re pretty proud to claim. Mom kept all the grocery store bags to reuse and I don’t know if it’s just me but my mom would sometimes wash any disposable plates and utensils. Talk about being environmentally friendly to the max!

Plastic bags in a reusable bag.

Source: Reddit User u/Nickthequick303

An obscene amount of oversized wood furniture

Why? We don’t know but we kind of miss it now. Would we trade our cheap IKEA or Rooms to Go furniture? Probably not, but the memories of seeing all the crystal dishes that we never used or the fake flower arrangements covered in dust as a centerpiece do sure bring us nostalgic memories

Wood furniture.

Source: Estate Sales

Plastic-covered dining tables

As soon as mom got that new dining table she would cover it with plastic. No special occasion was worthy of removing it and even then we were expected to use table place mats.

Plastic dining table cover.

Source: Balsa Circle

Crushed soda cans waiting to be recycled

If soda made it to that week’s grocery list you could be sure you’d be crushing those cans by the end of the week. Dad was ready to take them to recycle for 5 cents a piece. The struggle was real and your parents got every penny they could!

Crushed soda cans.

Source: Hip2Save

Fabuloso

A house was not clean until you had mopped every corner with Fabuloso. Actually it wasn’t clean until you could walk out into your driveway and smell that Fabuloso. But what do we purchase as adults to clean? That’s right, Fabuloso. A nostalgic scent.

Bottle of Fabuloso.

Source: JC Sales

Tupperware

Most of us grew up with Tupperware in our home. They were a staple in our mamá’s kitchen and we knew better than to borrow or lose any of them! As grown-ups we might visit our mom only to find the same items in her kitchen! Really has us wondering what these containers are made out of.

Tupperware stacked on top of one another.

Source: Main Home Design

Women in Texas at the National Women's March, rallying against deadly abortion restrictions.
Lucy Flores

The landscape of abortion rights in the United States has become more restrictive than ever in recent history, particularly in Arizona and Florida, where recent developments represent a major setback for women’s reproductive rights. On April 9, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in a 4-to-2 decision to uphold an 1864 law banning abortion from the moment of conception. The only exception is saving the mother’s life, but there are no exceptions for rape or incest under this law.

Just a few days earlier, on April 1, the Florida Supreme Court also ruled in favor of upholding a 6-week abortion ban, which will take effect on May 1. This further reduced the legal threshold for abortions in Florida, which used to be 24 weeks of pregnancy before Republicans passed a law in 2022 banning abortions after 15 weeks. Both of these rulings have sparked intense debate and outrage about their impact on women’s rights.

Overview of the Near-Total Abortion Ban in Arizona

The Arizona Supreme Court voted to uphold an 1864 law, a law passed even before the state officially was a part of the United States of America, that makes all types of abortion illegal, including medication abortion, from the moment of conception. Though there are exceptions in cases where the mother’s life is at risk, the ban makes no exceptions for cases of rape or incest and imposes severe penalties, including imprisonment, on medical professionals performing abortions.

Medical professionals have spoken out about how dire the situation will become for women with this near-total abortion ban. Dr. Jill Gibson, chief medical director of Planned Parenthood in Arizona, told CNN that this ruling will have “absolutely unbelievable consequences for the patients in our community.” She continued by saying, “Providers need to be able to take care of their patients without fear of legal repercussions and criminalization.”

Representatives from Arizona and other states across the country have also spoken up against this near-total abortion ban.

Video by Shontel Brown Member of the United States House of Representatives on InstagramVideo by Shontel Brown Member of the United States House of Representatives on Instagram


Image by Rub\u00e9n Gallego Member of the United States House of Representatives on InstagramImage by Rubén Gallego Member of the United States House of Representatives on InstagramImage by Rubén Gallego Member of the United States House of Representatives on Instagram

Until this Arizona Supreme Court decision, abortion had been legal in the state up to 15 weeks of pregnancy. The right to abortion via Roe v. Wade prevented the enforcement of the near-total abortion ban, but since a majority vote in the Supreme Court of the United States overturned Roe, those opposed to abortion rights had been fighting to enforce the 160-year-old 1864 law.

This new abortion ban in Arizona is not effective immediately as the court has paused its ruling for 14 days until additional arguments are heard in a lower court about how constitutional the law is. However, the law will likely come into effect in May, a few weeks from now. Planned Parenthood Arizona, the largest abortion provider in the state, will continue serving the community until the ban is enforced.

An Overview of Florida's Six-Week Abortion Ban

The landscape of abortion in Florida has also undergone a significant change with the enforcement of a 6-week abortion ban, replacing the previous 15-week limit. This ban, similar to Arizona's, severely restricts access to abortion care and poses a significant challenge to reproductive rights in the state. Providers are bracing for a public health crisis due to the increased demand for abortion and limited options for patients.

Practically speaking, a 6-week abortion ban is a near-total abortion ban because pregnant people often don’t even realize they could be pregnant by this early stage. Combined with Florida’s strict abortion requirements, which include mandatory in-person doctor visits with a 24-hour waiting period, it’s nearly impossible for those who may want an abortion to be able to access it before 6 weeks. Not to mention that fulfilling the requirements is particularly challenging for low-income individuals.

Video by theluncheonlawyer on InstagramVideo by theluncheonlawyer on Instagram

Moreover, this Florida law also restricts telemedicine for abortion and requires that medication be provided in person, effectively eliminating mail-order options for abortion pills. While exceptions for rape and incest exist in Florida, the requirements are also strict, asking victims to provide police records or medical records. For victims who don’t always report sexual violence for many different reasons, these exceptions don’t make a difference.

The consequences of Florida’s ban extend to neighboring states with more restrictive abortion laws. For instance, residents of Alabama, facing a total ban on abortion, and Georgia, with its own 6-week abortion ban, have relied on Florida for abortion services. That will no longer be an option, further limiting care alternatives.

The Road Ahead

These recent abortion bans in Arizona and Florida are a major setback for women's rights, particularly impacting Latina women who already face barriers to accessing quality healthcare. These bans not only restrict women’s reproductive freedom but also endanger their lives.

Efforts to challenge these bans through legal means and ballot measures are ongoing, but the road ahead is uncertain. While there’s hope for overturning these abortion bans, the challenges of conservative laws and legal battles are formidable. The November ballot in both states will be crucial in determining the future of abortion rights and access for all.

graphic design highlighting Dolores Huerta 94 birthday, the iconic civil rights activist and labor leader.

Today, Dolores Huerta, one of the most important Latino icons within civil rights, is turning 94 years old. This occasion is the perfect opportunity to celebrate not only her robust life but also her immense contributions as a social justice champion. Huerta is a living legend whose tireless efforts have helped transform the landscape of civil rights, feminism, labor rights, farmworkers’ rights, and even environmental justice.

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