Refresh Your Skincare Routine with these 5 Latina-Owned Brands

Skincare products

With most of the country still dealing with frigid temperatures, we know your skin might be in need of some serious TLC. We’re here to help you give your skin the amor it needs with some amazing Latina-owned brands. Skincare has become a ritual for many as we find ways to unplug from our daily routines and the bombardment of social media and the news.



When you’re facing the mirror and processing how you’ll start your day or reflect on how your day went, it’s also the perfect time to reflect and honor all of your feelings, uninterrupted. As you’re renewing your skin, it’s also a time to reset your thoughts and give yourself a chance to get a clean slate (pun intended).

Here are some Latina-owned brands that will help add some rejuvenation into your skin and your life!

Brujita Skincare

It’s easy to be obsessed with a brand like Brujita Skincare. Their conscious skincare brand celebrates natural products while celebrating misfits who enjoy beauty products that are as unique as they are. Brujita’s branding, their authenticity, and their community involvement makes them a brand you’ll religiously use.

Reina Skincare

After suffering from acne for years, the founder of Reina Skincare created her own brand that includes serums, oils, toners, exfoliators and more. As an Afro-Latina, the founder was inspired by the tropics and created a brand that will transport you into a tropical paradise.

XiCali Products


As a proud holistic brand, XiCali products only use ingredients that come from Mother Earth. Their natural cleansers, facial toners, and many other products encourage a holistic approach to skincare. Beyond skincare they offer a multitude of other wellness products to have you feeling 100%.

SunKiss Organics

We’ve highlighted SunKiss Organics before as an Afro-Latina brand you should be supporting. Not only do we love them for showing up as an empowering brand, we know their products are amazing! Between their facials, toners, and body balms, you’ll be feeling renewed after each use.

BelaDoce Botanicals


BelaDoce is all about the glow and we are not mad about it! In fact, we’re asking for more glow that is reflective of a healthy, happy skincare routine. Created by a seasoned skincare professional, BelaDoce brings beautiful products that work, to your everyday skincare needs.

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