The 5 Best Latinx Bands of the 2000s

RBD receiving a music award

File:Rbd.jpg - Wikipedia

From love ballads to empowering anthems, we’re bringing you the top five Latinx bands of the 2000s that had us singing and dancing along. Looking back, these bands shaped us in many ways and there’s no surprise that their songs continue to be bangers.

We narrowed it down to five bands that made waves and have us wishing they would release just one more album. We’re keeping our fingers crossed for the possibility - one can hope, right?

Here are five classics that will get you going down memory lane.


Sin Banderas

Originating in Mexico City in 2002, Leonel Garcia and Noel Schajris created music for the soul. Their soft-spoken ballads always inspired you to feel some kind of way and had you feeling melancholic with their lyrics and sounds.

Kumbia Kings

Started by A.B. Quintanilla, Selena Quintanilla’s brother, Kumbia Kings was all the rave in the cumbia scene. Kumbia Kings gave us music to dance, sing along with, and dance to. Plus they delivered collaborations with legends like Juan Gabriel and Aleks Syntec. Their music fused pop, reggae, hip hop, and R&B and brought us a new style of cumbia that had us dancing in our cars at every stop light.

Maná

While they didn’t form in the 2000s, Mana’s popularity has given them the title of best-selling Spanish-language rock band. Their hit song Mariposa Traicionera, released in 2002 was a defining moment for the band as the song became their first number one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot Latin Tracks.

RBD

Made famous from Televisa’s telenovela, Rebelde, RBD originated in Mexico in 2004 and made waves in the Latin pop genre. It’s been 16 years since the best-selling group formed and gave us classics to jam to. Everything from the lyrics to the aesthetics of the group made them the ‘it’ group to mimic. And with the RBD re-boot one of our re-launch wishes was fulfilled.

Camila

Formed in 2005 by Mario Domm and Pablo Hurtado, they were one of the last groups to give us music that made us sing along to romantic lyrics. Their pop-rock music was all the rave until 2019 when they released their last album. Sadness. Give us just one more!!


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