7 Latina Tiktokers We Can't Stop Dancing Along With

Woman dancing
Photo by Mike Von on Unsplash
woman in pink tank top and white shorts

Now that the global pandemic made TikTok dances an official thing we decided to spend some (even more) time scrolling through to find the best newly minted Latina creators.

We found 7 Latina creators who are inspiring our two left feet (yes, not all Latinas were born with rhythm). Dancing, or the attempting thereof, has all kinds of added health benefits. From decreasing your blood pressure to improving your mental health, we should be dancing, like ahora mismo.


@_javierittaaa

Still dancing @tracy.oj 😝

@_javieriitta’s vibes always put us in a good mood. She’s a Chilean Youtuber and model that has already racked up 12.1M likes on her page! Check her out.

@ferchugimenez has moves, we seriously couldn't stop scrolling through her page, wishing we could move like that :’( . With an impressive 36.7M likes so far, this Uruguayan is seriously kicking ass right now.

@reallyemely

where are my Latinos at

@reallyemely made us literally laugh out loud more than once while we were creeping on her feed and like that wasn’t enough she can also dance.

@stepsongrid

#salsatutorial #stepsongrid #foryoupage #latindance

@stepsongrid are absolute queens for this tutorial (we needed it) and if you scroll down these sisters have one for almost any Latinx dance style that you can think of.

@jimena.jimenezr

Ok. 1 tiktok no me lo borres. 2. Se me rompió la blusa. 3. Gracias insta por verificarme. 4 los amo 💙 #LA #xyzbca #fyp

@jimena.jimenezr became a TikTok star back in 2019, thanks to her amazing dances and hilarious content. This incredible Mexican creator has a whooping 1.6 Billion likes. Yep :O!

@mikaelamonetofficial

Wanna dance with me? Okaaaay! 🥰 #latina #dancing #happy #goodvibes #salsa

@mikaelamonetofficial As her bio states, “Welcome to the good vibes club” her account is full of dances to get your body moving and embrace your sensuality in no time.

@franciaraisa

I got nervous @etienneortega 😂😂 #dance #fyp #latina #latino #latinx

Do you guys remember Bring It On: All or Nothing? It's a must-watch! And if you do, you probably remember the talented @franciaraisa. Finding her on TikTok filled us with serious nostalgia. Not to be cheesy, but she still brings it on. ;)

I swear Latinx talent on TikTok is endless. We are so happy to see the community thriving on this platform. Please, let us know who else we should add, we will happily go look at their feed, we clearly love mindlessly scrolling through our FYP.

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