7 Latinx Podcasts You Should Listen To

Picture from left to right: Diane Guerrero, Ivy Queen,  Diosa Femme and Mala Munoz, Pam, Janny Perez, Gabby Rivera, and Dr. Jeniree Flores Delgado

Whichever podcast genre you are into, we made a list of Latinx podcasts worth checking out. The list has several podcasts with various topics if you’re looking to learn something, stay entertained, or get inspired.


LOUD: The History of Reggaeton

This new Spotify podcast has got to be one of our favorites. Ivy Queen gives us a crash course in each episode on the history of Reggeaton. “LOUD” dives into the origins of perreo, historic movements behind this genre, and features many artists who have redefined and contributed to reggaeton.

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Yeah No, I’m Not Ok

The Latinx community is very aware of the stigmas attached to mental health issues within our culture. Actress Diane Guerrero started this podcast to get others to open up and talk about this topic that affects so many. Guerrero and other celebrities of color explore issues like body image, anxiety, depression, and addictions. A Latina with a platform whose podcast is solely about mental health, what is there not to love about this?

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Cafe con Pam

A bilingual podcast where the Latinx community and people of color join Pam Covarrubias and speak on different topics in each episode. Examples that are close to our hearts are immigration status, healing our inner child, and rewriting our narratives.

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Locatora Radio

The feminist Latina podcast you didn’t know you needed. Diosa Femme and Mala Munoz are two Latinas who are killing it. Brujeria, pop culture, dancing, chisme, art, you name it, this duo has talked about it. This relatable and entertaining podcast is one you don’t want to miss.

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Joy Uprising

Marginalized QTBIPOC stories often are focused on trauma and unhappiness, but Gabby Rivera is changing that. She is starting a joy revolution with this podcast. Rivera is a queer Puerto Rican storyteller that created “Joy Uprising” to show there is still joy despite every hardship the community faces. Every episode, she asks every guest, “what brings you joy?” and we get to hear different stories being celebrated.

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Latinx Can

Dr. Jeniree Flores Delgado started a podcast where Latinx Professionals can give career advice, wisdom, tips, support, and encouragement. The Latinx community must see that they are our future doctors, scientists, astronauts, and whatnot. This podcast encourages us, Si Se Puede!

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The Latina Mom Legacy

Mamas also deserve a podcast to help them through parenthood. This podcast, created by Colombian American mother Janny Perez, helps mothers navigate raising bicultural children, provides advice, and tackles many other subjects. Mamas do not need to know everything, which is why podcasts like “Latina Mom Legacy” are so important.

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graphic showcasing 5 exceptional Latina athletes excelling in their sports: Tatiana Suarez (MMA), Catarina Macario (soccer), Gianna Woodruff (track and field), Diana Taurasi (basketball), and Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (hurdling).

In the sea of men that is athletics, women are fighting tooth and nail for their long-overdue recognition. Among them, Latina athletes are ferocious in their pursuit of excellence, and they’re already changing the game, trailblazing for the next generation.

These 5 Latina athletes have overcome enormous challenges, broken significant barriers, and are actively leaving their mark on athletics.

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Graphic design that features an illustration of Doña Marina, La Maliche.

La Malinche is one of the most well-known historical figures and representatives of indigenous women in Mexico. Also known as Maltintzin, Malinalli, or Doña Marina (as the Spanish called her), she was known as Hernán Cortés’s translator during the Spanish conquest. As a result, La Malinche has been perceived as a traitor to her own people, something that has been memorialized in Mexican slang. Being called a “malinchista” is the same as being called disloyal or a traitor to one’s country and culture.

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Candelabras adorned with religious motifs, casting a warm glow from flickering candles.

I often wondered how my abuelita could be so religious, praying all the time and never missing a Sunday at church. Yet there she was, sticking a knife in the ground whenever storm clouds rolled in, thinking it would "shoo the rain away." She'd give me the side-eye for my magic wand tattoo and believing in the power of manifestation, but would be the first to blame trickster “chaneques” when stuff went missing, and hang ceramic sheep on the door to supposedly "bring in the cash."

When I was younger, I found it to be somewhat hypocritical of her. Now, I just think it’s funny and sort of beautiful how our ancestors and surroundings have shaped our beliefs in such unique ways.

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