Latino Culture: Bugs on the Menu – Yum or Yuck?

A woman about to take a bite of a taco filled with grasshoppers

Latin American gastronomy is known for its rich flavors, varied textures, and inventive use of locally sourced ingredients. One of these components, often overlooked, is the use of insects in traditional dishes. For many Latinos, insects are not just a novelty but a part of their culinary identity.


Eating Insects: An Ancient Practice

a bowl of edible larvae

Insect consumption, or entomophagy, is not a recent fad but rather a practice dating back thousands of years. In pre-Columbian times, indigenous communities across Latin America, from Mexico to Brazil, regularly incorporated insects into their diet. Insects were a reliable food source, easy to find, and rich in essential nutrients.

The use of insects in Latino cuisine varies across the region, and it's closely tied to cultural identity. For example, in Mexico, insects like grasshoppers (chapulines), maguey worms (gusanos de maguey), and ant eggs (escamoles) are regional delicacies with deep cultural roots. In Brazil, Queen ants (Içá or Tanajura) are collected, fried, and eaten as a seasonal snack. The custom of insect consumption is also part of religious and festive events.

Some of the most common types of insects consumed include:

Chapulines (Grasshoppers)

Grasshopper tacos

Photo by latusavf on Instagram

Frequently found in Mexican markets, chapulines are rich in protein, fiber, good fats, and are a source of vitamins and minerals. Mix sautéed chapulines with onions, chili peppers, and tomatoes, then spoon this filling into a soft tortilla for some delicious tacos, or add a handful of toasted chapulines to your traditional guacamole recipe to provide a crunchy texture and an extra dose of protein!

Escamoles (Ant eggs)

Escamoles with tacos

Photo by pcdsld on Instagram

Known as 'Mexican caviar,' these ant larvae are a good source of protein and low in fat. For a delicious dish, you can sauté escamoles with onions, garlic, and epazote, then serve with warm tortillas as a taco or use escamoles as the main protein in a clear soup along with vegetables like carrots, zucchini, and peas.

Gusanos de Maguey (Maguey worms)

Maguey worms

Photo by bichoscomestiblesbyazcamolli on Instagram

These caterpillars are found in the Agave plant and are high in protein and vitamins. Add fried gusanos de maguey to your guacamole for a unique twist and extra protein, or add sautéed maguey worms to melted cheese and serve with tortillas for a delicious queso fundido.

Içá or Tanajura (Queen ants)

Salad dish with queen ants

Photo by sylviamacedo.photograf on Instagram

Consumed in Brazil, these insects are high in protein and low in saturated fats. Fry the ants with garlic, onions, peppers, and soy sauce, then serve over steamed rice for a protein-packed meal, or add fried queen ants to a clear vegetable soup for an extra boost of protein and unique flavor.

Are insects the future of sustainable and nutritious protein?

Grasshopper and avocado soups

Photo by T.Tseng on Flickr

Insects provide a substantial nutritional punch, with high levels of protein, fiber, and micronutrients like iron, zinc, and essential vitamins. Their nutritional profile makes them an excellent alternative to traditional sources of protein like beef, chicken, or pork.

From an environmental perspective, insect farming has a significantly smaller carbon footprint than livestock farming. Insects require less land, water, and food and produce fewer greenhouse gases. They can be farmed sustainably and could help address food security issues as global populations continue to rise.

Incorporating insects into the diet is not merely about novelty or shock value. For many Latinos, it's about preserving a historical tradition, a connection to their pre-Hispanic ancestors, and a sustainable way of eating. As the world seeks more environmentally friendly protein sources, we could learn a lot from the Latino tradition of entomophagy.

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