7 Latina Poetry Books to Add to Your Collection

image of the cover of four books

For some, poetry can be an escape from the world of novels and books. Talented writers have a unique ability to transport us out of our lives and into theirs with their ability to create stories with meaning. We’re highlighting some amazing Latinx poets who give us all the feels and would be a great edition for your bookshelf.


We’d be remiss if we did not give Alegria Publishing a shoutout for their work as an indie publishing company whose primary mission is to nurture emerging Latinx writers. Our list includes several of their publications because it’s important that we create our own Latinx spaces and uplift those who are also doing the same.

“Déjame Contarte Lo Que Dice El Corazón” by Paloma Alcantar

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Interested in words of wisdom as one navigates through the trials and tribulations of love? Paloma Alcantar’s poetry book is sure to meet your needs. Every word is beautifully written to capture all of the emotions one experiences in love, and we’re settling in for it.

book cover for \u201cD\u00e9jame Contarte Lo Que Dice El Coraz\u00f3n\u201d by Paloma Alcantar

Copyright: Alegria Publishing

“Imperfecta” by Alejandra Ramos Gómez

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Meditations on being a woman, migrant, and a Latina. Alejandra perfectly captures what it means to live in-between two cultures and the struggles of making peace with your identity and your lived experiences.

book cover \u201cImperfecta\u201d by Alejandra Ramos G\u00f3mez

Copyright: Alegria Publishing

“Corazón” by Yesika Salgado

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The first of her three poetry books, Yesika Salgado has enamored our hearts with her way with words. Salgado also co-founded Chingona Fire, a poetry collective based on highlighting Latina feminist poets. We highly recommend checking out her other books entitled “Hermosa” and “Tesoro”.

book cover for \u201cCoraz\u00f3n\u201d by Yesika Salgado

Copyright: Not A Cult Publishing

“Mujer de Color(es)” by Alejandra Jimenez

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Tackling everything from obstacles in expressing cultura to embracing your femininity, Alejandra Jimenez does well to tackle it all in entrancing words. Reexamine your ability to embrace your feminine strengths with this guide, it won’t let you down.

book cover for \u201cMujer de Color(es)\u201d by Alejandra Jimenez

Copyright: Alegria Publishing

“El Poemario del Colibrí | The Hummingbird Poems” by Edyka Chilomé

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Edyka Chilomé is a Mexican Salvadoran poet, identifying as queer, indigenous, and mestiza. Her work is heavily centered around transformative moments full of meaning in her book “El Poemario del Colibrí” (“The Hummingbird Poems” in English).

book cover for \u201cEl Poemario del Colibr\u00ed | The Hummingbird Poems\u201d by Edyka Chilom\u00e9

Copyright: Deep Vellum

“Groanings from the Desert” by Alma Cardenas

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Alma Cardenas allows us a glimpse into her mind with “Groanings from the Desert”, a bilingual collection of poems in both English and Spanish. Cardenas wrote all of these works in 2020 between February and October, so there’s plenty of space for everyone to enjoy her thoughts along with her.

book cover for \u201cGroanings from the Desert\u201d by Alma Cardenas

Copyright: Alegria Publishing

“The Latinx Poetry Project” by Davina Ferreira

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If you’re looking for the end all be all collection of poetry by Latinx poets, we’re recommending “The Latinx Poetry Project”. Over 45 Latinx poets are featured in this immense collection of work centered around a variety of themes: from social justice to feminism and beyond, this book truly has it all.

book cover for \u201cThe Latinx Poetry Project\u201d by Davina Ferreira

Copyright: Alegria Publishing

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